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Our intelligence agencies are spying on Trump

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Postby TechJunkie on 15 Feb 2017 00:46

Our intelligence agencies are spying on Trump

Intercepts showed that Flynn discussed U.S. sanctions in a phone call with the Russian ambassador — a conversation topic that Flynn first denied and then later said he could not recall.

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Postby slamminshaun on 15 Feb 2017 09:11

Re: Our intelligence agencies are spying on Trump

Intercepts showed that TechJunkie was posting on the Internet on Valentine's Day while everyone else was getting laid.
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Postby TechJunkie on 15 Feb 2017 10:46

Re: Our intelligence agencies are spying on Trump

Haha as we already know, you can't even handle hearing about my sex life.

This thing where intelligence agencies get involved in politics is the kind of thing that you expect somewhere like Russia or Venezuela.

What's next, are we going to end up with some intelligence agencies who are loyal to the president and others who are loyal to Congress and others that go rogue and focus on self-preservation? That's only a step away from dueling paramilitary groups like in Colombia or Argentina.
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I had a dream last night I was piloting a plane
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Postby LeVeL on 15 Feb 2017 11:13

Re: Our intelligence agencies are spying on Trump

This Administration is a mess. I keep hearing news about infighting in the Trump camp and the President Advisors not getting along.

As more information gets released is really becoming clear that Trump and his top Advisors have been in cahoots with Russian Government/Putin. I do not blame our Intelligence Agencies for spying on Trump and his Advisors. I do not trust this Administration and the American people shouldn't either.

The Trump voters felt they were the smartest guys in the room when their guy was elected. I wonder how they are feeling as every day passes and this Administration continues to crumble.
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Right-Wingers gonna Hate

Postby Mattivi on 15 Feb 2017 12:16

Re: Our intelligence agencies are spying on Trump

slamminshaun wrote:
Intercepts showed that TechJunkie was posting on the Internet on Valentine's Day while everyone else was getting laid.


Lmao!!
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Postby TechJunkie on 15 Feb 2017 14:24

Re: Our intelligence agencies are spying on Trump

...Our Intelligence Community is so worried by the unprecedented problems of the Trump administration—not only do senior officials possess troubling ties to the Kremlin, there are nagging questions about basic competence regarding Team Trump—that it is beginning to withhold intelligence from a White House which our spies do not trust.

...

How things are heating up between the White House and the spooks is evidenced by a new report that the CIA has denied a security clearance to one of Flynn’s acolytes. Rob Townley, a former Marine intelligence officer selected to head up the NSC’s Africa desk, was denied a clearance to see Sensitive Compartmented Information (which is required to have access to SIGINT in particular). Why Townley’s SCI was turned down isn’t clear—it could be over personal problems or foreign ties—but the CIA’s stand has been privately denounced by the White House, which views this as a vendetta against Flynn. That the Townley SCI denial was reportedly endorsed by Mike Pompeo, the new CIA director selected by Trump himself, only adds to the pain.

There is more consequential IC pushback happening, too. Our spies have never liked Trump’s lackadaisical attitude toward the President’s Daily Brief, the most sensitive of all IC documents, which the new commander-in-chief has received haphazardly. The president has frequently blown off the PDB altogether, tasking Flynn with condensing it into a one-page summary with no more than nine bullet-points. Some in the IC are relieved by this, but there are pervasive concerns that the president simply isn’t paying attention to intelligence.

In light of this, and out of worries about the White House’s ability to keep secrets, some of our spy agencies have begun withholding intelligence from the Oval Office. Why risk your most sensitive information if the president may ignore it anyway? A senior National Security Agency official explained that NSA was systematically holding back some of the “good stuff” from the White House, in an unprecedented move. For decades, NSA has prepared special reports for the president’s eyes only, containing enormously sensitive intelligence. In the last three weeks, however, NSA has ceased doing this, fearing Trump and his staff cannot keep their best SIGINT secrets.

Since NSA provides something like 80 percent of the actionable intelligence in our government, what’s being kept from the White House may be very significant indeed. However, such concerns are widely shared across the IC, and NSA doesn’t appear to be the only agency withholding intelligence from the administration out of security fears.

What’s going on was explained lucidly by a senior Pentagon intelligence official, who stated that “since January 20, we’ve assumed that the Kremlin has ears inside the SITROOM,” meaning the White House Situation Room, the 5,500 square-foot conference room in the West Wing where the president and his top staffers get intelligence briefings. “There’s not much the Russians don’t know at this point,” the official added in wry frustration.

...

I previously warned the Trump administration not to go to war with the nation’s spies, and here’s why. This is a risky situation, particularly since President Trump is prone to creating crises foreign and domestic with his incautious tweets. In the event of a serious international crisis of the sort which eventually befalls almost every administration, the White House will need the best intelligence possible to prevent war, possibly even nuclear war. It may not get the information it needs in that hour of crisis, and for that it has nobody to blame but itself.

John Schindler is a security expert and former National Security Agency analyst and counterintelligence officer. A specialist in espionage and terrorism, he’s also been a Navy officer and a War College professor. He’s published four books and is on Twitter at @20committee.

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PS: I was working late last night after taking most of the day off to spend with my three different Valentines. You really don't need to worry about my sex life. I'm a Hakkasan VP with an unlimited first-class travel budget and expense account and a thousand-dollar-a-month comp card so that I don't even have to make up a business excuse to take a date to dinner. It's not hard to get laid in a situation like that is it?
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Postby JMT on 15 Feb 2017 14:50

Re: Our intelligence agencies are spying on Trump

"Working".

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Postby JMT on 15 Feb 2017 14:52

Re: Our intelligence agencies are spying on Trump

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Postby Mattivi on 15 Feb 2017 15:22

Re: Our intelligence agencies are spying on Trump

Wow, Tech makes trolling so easy, I dont even know where to start, but I will take a shot....Listen if you think bullet pointing off a bunch of reasons, all of which happen to be categorically superficial, is a way to show us how adept you are at getting laid then there is probably not much that is going to help you here. I, and I think most guys in general, actually have more respect for the guy that can mack on a budget. Cause lets face the music, Its easy to pull ass when you have "access" to all the fixings and trimmings you just listed; one could be old, fat, toothless, bald, liver spotted, glass-eyed and even a career computer geek like yourself can have your day under the sun, its Vegas afterall. So I'm not impressed, nor suprised as TNL is a perpetual, living museum of your rapacious self-aggrandizement. I will part from this since you need a refresher from your beloved belief system you promulgate so proudly...

Displaying riches and titles with pride brings about one’s downfall. - Tao Te Ching.
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Postby TechJunkie on 16 Feb 2017 00:07

Re: Our intelligence agencies are spying on Trump

This is unbelievable, even though I was expecting the worst:

White House Plans to Have Trump Ally Review Intelligence Agencies

WASHINGTON — President Trump plans to assign a New York billionaire to lead a broad review of American intelligence agencies, according to administration officials, an effort that members of the intelligence community fear could curtail their independence and reduce the flow of information that contradicts the president’s worldview.

The possible role for Stephen A. Feinberg, a co-founder of Cerberus Capital Management, has met fierce resistance among intelligence officials already on edge because of the criticism the intelligence community has received from Mr. Trump during the campaign and since he became president. On Wednesday, Mr. Trump blamed leaks from the intelligence community for the departure of Michael T. Flynn, his national security adviser, whose resignation he requested.

There has been no announcement of Mr. Feinberg’s job, which would be based in the White House, but he recently told his company’s shareholders that he is in discussions to join the Trump administration. He is a member of Mr. Trump’s economic advisory council.

Mr. Feinberg, who has close ties to Stephen K. Bannon, Mr. Trump’s chief strategist, and Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law, declined to comment on his possible position. The White House, which is still working out the details of the intelligence review, also would not comment.

Bringing Mr. Feinberg into the administration to conduct the review is seen as a way of injecting a Trump loyalist into a world the White House views with suspicion. But top intelligence officials fear that Mr. Feinberg is being groomed for a high position in one of the intelligence agencies.

Mr. Bannon and Mr. Kushner, according to current and former intelligence officials and Republican lawmakers, had at one point considered Mr. Feinberg for either director of national intelligence or chief of the Central Intelligence Agency’s clandestine service, a role that is normally reserved for career intelligence officers, not friends of the president. Mr. Feinberg’s only experience with national security matters is his firm’s stakes in a private security company and two gun makers.

On an array of issues — including the Iran nuclear deal, the utility of NATO, and how best to combat Islamist militancy — much of the information and analysis produced by American intelligence agencies contradicts the policy positions of the new administration. The divide is starkest when it comes to Russia and President Vladimir V. Putin, whom Mr. Trump has repeatedly praised while dismissing American intelligence assessments that Moscow sought to promote his own candidacy.

Against this backdrop, Mr. Trump has appointed Mike Pompeo, a former Republican congressman from Kansas, to run the C.I.A., and former Senator Dan Coats, an Indiana Republican, to be the director of national intelligence (he is still awaiting confirmation). Both were the preferred choices of the Republican congressional leadership and Vice President Mike Pence and had no close or longstanding ties to Mr. Trump. In fact, they each endorsed Senator Marco Rubio of Florida for president during the 2016 Republican primaries.

But the potential White House role for Mr. Feinberg follows intense speculation among intelligence professionals that Mr. Feinberg is in line for a powerful position within the intelligence community.

Reports that Mr. Feinberg was under consideration to run the clandestine service rocked the intelligence community in recent weeks, raising the prospect of direct White House control over America’s spies at a time when Mr. Trump’s ties to Mr. Putin are under investigation by the F.B.I. and congressional committees.

The last time an outsider with no intelligence experience took the job was in the early days of the Reagan administration, when Max Hugel, a businessman who had worked on Mr. Reagan’s campaign, was named to run the spy service. His tenure at the C.I.A. was marked by turmoil and questions about the politicization of the agency. He was forced to resign after six months, amid accusations about his past business dealings. (He later won a libel case against the two brothers who made the accusations.)

Even the prospect that Mr. Feinberg may lead a review for the White House has raised concerns in the intelligence community.

Mr. Coats is especially angry at what he sees as a move by Mr. Bannon and Mr. Kushner to sideline him before he is even confirmed, according to current and former officials. He believes the review would impinge on a central part of his role as the director of national intelligence and fears that if Mr. Feinberg were working at the White House, he could quickly become a dominant voice on intelligence matters.

Michael V. Hayden, a retired general who ran the C.I.A. and the National Security Agency during President George W. Bush’s administration, said it was hard to wrap his head around “the idea of a D.N.I. nominee in the confirmation process while others consider retooling the position.”

“I think I’d be concerned, too,” he said.

The challenge is less immediate for Mr. Pompeo. He does not see an urgent need for a review of the intelligence community, according to current and former American officials, but sees it as better than the appointment of Mr. Feinberg to a job with actual authority over daily intelligence operations.

Many intelligence officials question what purpose a White House intelligence review would serve other than to position Mr. Feinberg for a larger role in the future. Most significant changes to the intelligence community would require an act of Congress, a fact that would ultimately blunt whatever ideas or proposals Mr. Feinberg came up with. Even with a Republican majority in both houses, getting Congress to agree to major changes to intelligence agencies seems unlikely.

It is difficult to “object to someone putting fresh eyes on the organization of the intelligence community,” Mr. Hayden said. “But, even though the D.N.I. staff has become far too large, I don’t think any of us think a major restructuring of the community is in order.”

Tensions between the intelligence community and the White House have already played out on several fronts. Before Mr. Flynn was forced out, one of his top aides, Robin Townley, was denied a security clearance by the C.I.A. But distrust of the intelligence community has been building for years in conservative political circles, where the C.I.A. during the Obama administration was seen as heavily politicized.

Representative Steve King, Republican of Iowa, said in a recent interview that some officials in the intelligence community were trustworthy but “not all.”

“People there need to be rooted out,” Mr. King said.

Another Republican lawmaker said that the predominant view at the White House is also that the politicians in the intelligence agencies need to be cleaned out.

Through Cerberus, his private equity company, Mr. Feinberg has strong ties to the government contracting industry. Cerberus owns DynCorp International, which has had a wide array of large contracts providing security to the State Department and other agencies. DynCorp is now locked in a major legal dispute over the fate of a $10 billion State Department contract that it previously held to provide air support for counternarcotics operations overseas.

John F. Kelly, the new Homeland Security secretary, was paid $166,000 a year as a DynCorp adviser until he was named to the new administration.

Cerberus also owns Remington Outdoor, a major firearms manufacturer.

In 2008, Mr. Feinberg also considered investing in Blackwater, the security firm founded by Erik Prince, a former member of the Navy SEALs, before it was ultimately acquired by other investors.

New York magazine reported last year that Mr. Feinberg went to Blackwater’s North Carolina compound in 2005 to take firearms training.


Mattivi, women totally go for guys on budgets. You own that. Probably would work in Vegas, anybody can get laid there. Anyway who was it who brought up my sex life, was that me?
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